GEORGIAN ART FROM THE NEW MILWAUKEE ART MUSEUM

SOME GEORGIAN ART FROM

THE NEW MILWAUKEE ART MUSEUM



Following a major renovation and rehanging of the entire collections, it was time to celebrate...at one of several Opening Parties, we met for cocktails and canapes in the Calatrava addition (completed 2001). After the  official ribbon-cutting, we proceeded into the Older but newly renovated sections to view the entire collection in a new format.



MAM notice!

The Milwaukee Art Museum website is here.

Victoria here. As a long-time member, docent, volunteer, and staffer at the MAM, I was eager to see old friends in a new setting...and to enjoy the refreshed facilities, from the building itself, the HVAC system, lighting, and re-organisation of the collection. 

European Galleries

One (or three?) of those old friends: 
Triple Profile Portrait, C. 1560-80
French, School of Fontainebleau



Most of the galleries were closed for several years to complete the 6-year, $34 million for the renovation and expansion.  Special exhibitions went on in the Calatrava Wing, but we were very happy to see some of our favorites on display again.


The Age of Enlightenment--Immanuel Kant, 2008
by Yinka Shonibare, English, b. 1962
mixed media, purchase by the Contemporary Art Society




The MAM has a particularly fine presentation of American furniture, much from the Chipstone Foundation, as well as the Layton Art Collection. Read about the Chipstone Foundation here


Another of my personal favorites: London Visitors, 1874, by  James Tissot
French (1836-1902) A view on the steps of the National Gallery with the the Church of St. Martin-in-the-Fields in the background.

And now to some promised Art from the Georgian Period, in both Britain and the U.S., her  colonies during much of the period 1714-1837

Miss Frances Lee, 1769
Francis Cotes (English, 1726–1770)


Portrait of Jane Emma Orde, ca. 1806
John Hoppner (English, 1758–1810)

Puzzle Jug, ca. 1820
Sunderland or New Castle, England


Richard, Viscount Ennismore, 1820/25
Attributed to John Barry (British, active 1784–1827)

Landscape, n.d.
John Constable (English, 1776–1837)

Thomas Lawrence (English, 1769–1830)
Frederick, Duke of York, n.d.

There Were Not Found Women as Fair as the Daughters of Job in all the Land..., plate 20 from the series, "Illustrations from the Book of Job", 1825
William Blake (English, 1757–1827)

Portrait of a Terrier, The Property of Owen Williams, ESQ., M.P. (Jocko with a Hedgehog), 1828  Edwin Landseer    (English, 1802–1873)

Elizabeth McClure or Cecil Carnan, Mrs. Mordecai Gist, 1774–75
Charles Willson Peale (American, 1741–1827)

Eliza Susan Morton, Mrs. Josiah Quincy, 1809
Gilbert Stuart (American, 1755–1828)

Philadelphia, High Chest of Drawers, 1760-75


John James Audubon (American, b. Santo Domingo [now Haiti], 1785–1851). Entrapped Otter (Canada Otter), ca. 1827–30. 

John Singleton Copley (American, 1738–1815)
Alice Hooper, ca. 1763

 Also on view until May 31, 2016 are two more portraits by Copley.  The MAM states, "For the inaugural exhibition in the Constance and Dudley Godfrey American Art Wing’s Focus Gallery, the Milwaukee Art Museum will show two rare paintings never before exhibited in the United States: a pair of pendant portraits of American colonists Anne and Duncan Stewart by the country’s first old master, John Singleton Copley. Painted by Copley in 1767, the portraits show the Scottish couple who were prominent in Boston and Connecticut politics until the American War of Independence, when they took the loyalist side. In honor of their support, the English king restored their estates confiscated during the Jacobite Uprising, and the couple returned to Scotland, taking the portraits with them. Now owned by Edinburgh’s Stewart society—descendents of the sitters—the works will be returning to the United States for the first time in almost 250 years.

Duncan Stewart of Ardsheal, d. 1793
by John S. Copley, 1767

Anne Erving, Mrs. Duncan Stewart (1740-after 1802)
by John S. Copley

I hope I didn't miss too much -- I am delighted to say there will be many return visits to the newly re-hung galleries!

  For now, just a few pictures of the magnificent building in three parts:


A view of the first War Memorial Center from the south) by Eero Saarinen, opened in 1957, which included the Milwaukee Art Center

The recently expanded and renovated Kahler Wing (1975 and 2015)
from the east


Two views of the Calatrava Wing and the two other sections;
looking north from Lake Michigan


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